HOME

 

 Ship Lists

 Portuguese Roots

 Other Resources

 Forgot Password?

    Pioneer Portuguese Families of the Sacramento Area

Surnames
 A-B

Surnames
 C-D

Surnames
 E-F

Surnames
 G-L

Surnames
 M-N

Surnames
 O-R

Surnames
 S

Surnames
 T-Z


Surnames C To D

Joe CABRAL was born December 19, 1897, in Flores, the Azores, and came to the U.S. when about ten years old, going to a ranch in Merced. He later worked on farms and on the haypress in the Riverside/Pocket area, and met MARIA SOUZA, daughter of Frank Julio and Mariana Julia Souza, who had come to Sacramento with her mother when she was four years old to join her father, settling at 18th and X Streets.

Maria and Joe met when her mother went to work as a cook for Joe Rico, for whom her father also worked. Maria lived on the ranch with her parents and attended Upper Lisbon School, later moving back to the city. Joe and Maria married on October 4, 1917, when Maria was almost 14. Their children: Bill, Violet, Betty Jean, and Jo-Ann. Betty Jean died in 1976.

Joe then went to work for Southern Pacific, making railroad rails. About 1919 they moved to Byron to work on a dairy with Maria's parents. They leased the dairy and worked there about two years, when they sold the business and moved back to Sacramento. Joe then became a carpenter and worked for contractors Mike Fortado and John Fernandez of Sierra Builders.

The Cabrals jointly with Maria's parents and Mike Fortado acquired three lots at 18th and Y Street on the northeast corner and built three homes. Maria and Joe sold their home and built a large home behind the front house with the first Portuguese tile roof in Sacramento.

In 1927 the Cabrals sold their home and bought 40 acres east of Perkins, now part of Rosemont. They constructed two homes opposite Albert Einstein middle school, and lived first in one house on Mirandy Drive, and then constructed a larger home several doors away.

Joe ranched the acreage raising olives and grapes mainly, and Maria packed fruit for the A.B. Humphrey Ranch. Maria traveled during the fruit season to other areas and came home on weekends.

Joe also worked on the haypress during this time, and later in his career mostly as a carpenter with Sierra Builders.

He sold half of the ranch for farming, and later the other half was sold to build the school. Joe retired then and traveled twice to the Azores and continental Portugal. He died June 11, 1983.

Maria Cabral later made a name for herself in Sacramento as a radio personality, as noted in Chapter 16, but even before that, around 1925, began acting in local plays. She performed at the Egyptian Theatre, a tent, which later became the site of the Alhambra Theatre on 31st Street, now Alhambra Boulevard. She acted in her first professional show, "Dear Uncle Henry," which ran for one week.

Previously she had acted in amateur shows at St. Elizabeth's Church, and also went to Oakland with Gabe Silveira to perform in a three-act show at the UPC convention.

While raising her family in the 1950s, she was active in the Luso-American Fraternal Federation as a Sacramento-Manteca youth director. She continued working with Luso after she retired from her career in radio. Until her husband died, she was also involved in other community affairs, including chairperson for Portugal for all of the United Nations International dinners at the old Fair Grounds on Stockton Boulevard, and Camellia Festival chairperson for the Portuguese representation in the 1960s and 1970s.

[Mary Cabral]

MANUEL CAB RAL was born August 16, 1903, at Ribeirinha, Pico, Azores, the son of Manuel Cabral and Maria Gloria Silva, both natives of Ribeirinha. He immigrated to California at age eight, settling around Sacramento where he attended Lincoln School. In 1925 he married Mary.

At the time he was working as a haypress laborer. In 1933 he worked for Swift Meat Packing Co., becoming a plant superintendent in 1944. Later he entered the grocery business, operating three markets: Freeport, Manor, and Delmar Markets, until 1960, when he retired. While in the grocery business he was associated with Manuel Neves.

He and Mary had five children: Richard, Madeline Cardoso, Dorothy Neto, Mary Jane Perry, and Joseph Cabral.

He became president of the UPEC council in Sacramento in 1942, and became the 50th president of the supreme council.

On one of his many trips back to the Azores he suffered a heart attack and died suddenly at Ribeirinha on June 4, 1966. He was buried later in Sacramento.

[Carlos Almeida, Portuguese Immigrants, UPEC, 1978]

MANUEL CALDEIRA was born in Faial, and settled in the Clarksburg area on the John Soto ranch a little north of the Freeport ferry landing. He married MARIA DEL-PHINA BITTENCOURT, also born in Faial.

She was a niece of John Soto, who sent for her and paid her passage to his home to help his wife raise her children. The Sotos considered her a helper, not a maid, and she was godmother to a great number of the Soto children, highly respected and appreciated by the Soto family. She was called "Ti-Tia Maria." She had one sister in the area, Martha Bittencourt Silva, who took over her sons grocery store in Freeport, the J. F. Silva Cash Store.

After Maria Delphina married, John Soto deeded a small parcel of land from his ranch to her in appreciation of her services to his family. There is a house on that parcel near the levee where Maria raised her two sons, Manuel and John Caldeira.

Son MANUEL CALDEIRA married MARY G. SILVA and remained in the family home, taking care of the aging Ti-Tia Maria until she died of old age at home. Manuel drowned in the Sacramento River, believed to have fallen off the Hood Ferry, in 1933 at age 49. There were no witnesses to the accident. He and Maria had two children, Marie Caldeira, who married Harry Baliel; and Manuel "Babe Caldeira, who married Verna Neves. Verna was the daughter of Jose Ignacio Neves of Pico and the former Filamena Lee. Marie and Harry Baliel continued living in the same family home after Marie's mother died in 1959. Widowed Marie, Ti-Tia's granddaughter, still lives in the same home.

Ti-Tia Maria Caldeira's second son, John CALDEIRA, who was born January 27, 1886, did not live at home. He worked in the Pocket area brickyard for many years. He married ADELINE MILDRED VALINE (Addie), born April 9, 1887, sister of Maggie Valine Pimentel. Addie and John had one daughter, Edna Caldeira, who married Clarence Peters from Freeport. In retirement, John and Addie Caldeira had made their home in Aptos, Calif., but because of failing health moved back to Sacramento to be near their daughter. John Caldeira died August 15, 1966, and Addie a month and a half later on October 9, 1966.

[Ellen Silva Loverde; Edna Caldeira Peters; Anna Freitas Soto; Grace Freitas Rose]

ANTONIO MARIA CANIJO was born May 3, 1875, in Urros, Portugal. In 1911, at age 36, he married MARIA de GRACA CRESPO, who was born May 3, 1874, also in Urros.

With their two young daughters, Ricardina and nine-months-old Maria Amalia, they boarded a British immigrant steamer, the SS Osteric, bound for the Hawaiian Islands. Sugar plantation owners there had hired the ship to transport to the islands people who were interested in working on the plantations, providing free passage to the prospective workers and their families, and guaranteed work for one year.

The Osteric crowded 1500 Portuguese and Spanish immigrants aboard, the large number of passengers making for very bad conditions. During the voyage measles and scarlet fever epidemics broke out, and 58 children died. Many passengers were seasick.

Antonio found a job in the ship's kitchen so that his family could eat well. Finally, after almost two months at sea on the overcrowded ship, they arrived in Honolulu. After being processed there, they were sent to Hilo to work on a sugar plantation. After a couple of years in the fields and having saved their money, they boarded a ship for San Francisco, and from there traveled to Sacramento where they had relatives. Antonio found work on the farms around Sacramento, first as a laborer and then as a foreman.

A son, Americo (Medico) Eugene, was born on March 17, 1914. At age 20 he converted the name Canijo phonetically to Canische, an approximation of the Portuguese pronunciation. A decade later, in the 1940s, he had a bar, the Club Royal, at 7th and L Streets in Sacramento, near the Greyhound Depot. In the 1970s he was proprietor of a restaurant and bar near 5th and Broadway named Medicos, named after himself (drop the A and Americo sounds like "medico" in Portuguese.) Americo married Cecelia Isabelle Vargas and had two children: Marilyn Canis-che Thielen, and Sandra Canische McGrath. Americo died in 1981. (See VARGAS.)

The youngest child was daughter Lucinda (Lucy) Augusta, born on May 28, 1916. She married Richard Cunha, and had one son, Richard Cunha.

Ricardina Canejo married Edward Maria in Sacramento and had seven children: Margaret Maria Tompkins (1919-1945), Alice Maria Neves (1916-1964), Tony Maria, Edward Maria, Arthur Maria, Ida Maria Meade, and Leonard Maria (1929-1964). Ricardina, who was born in Urros in 1895, died in Sacramento in 1938.

Maria Amalia (Molly), born in Urros on August 25, 1910, married Alfonso Leon, and had one daughter, Arlene Leon Kaye.

[Sandie Canische McGrath]

John F. CARDOSO was born December 14, 1904, in Horta, Faial.

On March 20, 1936, he married ELISA LOPES at St. Josephs Church, Lincoln, California. Elisa was born March 3, 1912, in Caveira, Flores, the daughter of Joaquim Pedro Lopes (born March 15, 1875) and Maria Joaquina de Sousa (born July 12, 1889), who married in Caveira in October 1910. The other children: Laura, Louie, Gerald, and Jaime. All but Gerald were born in Flores; Gerald in Placer County.

Elisas father worked a year or two on a fruit ranch upon arriving in Newcastle from Flores in 1921, and then moved to Tracy and milked cows. He bought a dairy there, but lost it during the Depression. He had sent for his family soon after he arrived, but due to immigration quotas they were unable to come to the U.S. until 1932. Elisa and the rest of the family arrived aboard the ship Sinaii in Providence, R.I., on May 25, and then joined her father in Tracy, staying there just four months until moving to a rented fruit ranch in the Mt. Pleasant area of Placer County. After four years, Joaquim Lopes bought a fruit ranch in Loomis, which he farmed until he retired, moving to town about 1948 after selling the ranch to his son Louis. He died in Roseville November 16, 1968. His wife, Maria, died April 30, 1979.

Elisa spoke Portuguese at home because her mother did, even after 40 years. Elisa's siblings went to school in Lincoln but Elisa was older and taught herself.

John and Elisa Cardoso had three children: Roy, born in 1938; Glenn, born in 1944; and Marlene, born in 1949.

John was a fruit farmer, working for others at first and then buying his own fruit ranch in October 1941 on Taylor Road in Loomis. He died April 2, 1953.

The long-widowed Elisa raised her three children alone. She rented out her fruit ranch until 1959, then sold it and moved to Loomis.

[Elisa Lopes Cardoso]

NANCY CAREY (Ignacia Louisa Duarte Carreira) was born December 15, 1862, in Pedro Miguel, Faial. She came to the U.S. in 1870 at age seven with her parents, who settled in the Providence R.I. area.

There she married Joe GRACE, and had two children, Joe Jr. and Mary. Joe Grace was a whaler and was lost at sea. She then married Joseph CARREIRA, who was also from Faial, and had four more children, Manuel, Maria, Rose, and Toney. Her second husband was also a whaler and was lost at sea in 1900. She returned to Faial about 1901 with her children.

In 1903 she returned to Rhode Island and started a linguica factory to support herself and her six children. Her daughter, Rose, contracted tuberculosis so she moved with all of her family to California about 1914, settling in Lincoln until her death in 1936.

Her son Joe Grace Jr. settled in San Leandro. He had a son, Joe, and daughter Mary Stillwough. Nancy Carey's daughter Mary married a Serpa.

The Carreiras all settled in the Sacramento area, and the name was changed to Carey.

MANUEL CAREY married FRANCES BETTENCOURT and had two sons and one daughter.

MAMIE CAREY married a Souza first and had a son, George. Her second marriage was to Joe MADERIOS, and they had one daughter.

ROSE CAREY married MANUEL I. VARGAS. When he died about 1919 in the flu epidemic, she married his brother, TONY VARGAS, and had two sons, Joseph E. and Edward A. Vargas. (See VARGAS.)

Nancy Carey had eight grandchildren on the Carey side, 22 great grandchildren, and 26 great great grandchildren.

Nancys son TONEY CAREY (Antone Ferreira Carreiro) was born March 6, 1898, in Providence. He learned the shoemaker trade and opened his own shoe shop in 1921 at Lincoln. The shop closed in 1936 due to the Depression, and he then went to work for Gladding, McBean Pipe & Ceramics Co. in Lincoln. He retired in 1960, and died August 9, in Lincoln. He had married Laura Elizabeth Robinson of Helena, Montana, in 1932 at Reno, and they had one son, James Dennis Carey, and one grandchild, Toni Renee Carey, born June 19, 1963, in Roseville

[Joseph Enos Vargas; James Dennis Carey]

FRANK CHAQUICO was born in Ligares, District of Braganca, Portugal, on July 12, 1884, the son of Francisco Antonio Chaquico and Candida Joaquina Pires. He married ANNA JoaQuina MORAIS on April 20, 1906, and they had two daughters born in Portugal, Katie Chaquico Perry and Marguerite Chaquico Ferreira. Anna was the daughter of Antonio Francisco Morais and the former Maria dos Santos Mineira.

Frank worked for the railroad in Portugal, and in 1918 decided to come to America where he settled in Pinole, Calif., and then two years later moved to Sacramento where he had relatives and friends. In 1920 he sent for his wife and two daughters, all arriving in Sacramento on August 1, 1920. Two more daughters were born in Sacramento, namely, Mary Chaquico Martinez and Isabel Chaquico Mack.

He went to work in Sacramento for the Southern Pacific Railroad, retiring in 1958. Anna worked seasonally for Del Monte Cannery at 2nd and P Streets.

Frank Chaquico looked forward to the fall season so he could make his barrel of wine, which he later processed into port wine. Later, he would join in comradery with his friends out in the backyard for snacks consisting of his wife's home-baked bread, salami, cheese and home-cured olives and, of course, his port wine.

He died July 2, 1975, missing his 90th birthday by only ten days. Anna died October 17, 1986, at the age of 102. They left behind eight grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren, and 11 great-great grandchildren.

Daughter Katie married Manuel Perry Sr., who came to the U.S. in 1920. He was the son of Jose Pereira, who came to America in 1914 for two years and then returned to Portugal. Manuel and Katie Perry's children are Manuel Perry Jr., who married Mary Jane Cabral; and Ronald Perry, who married Dillia Jean Simpson.

[Katie Chaquico Perry]

Joseph SILVA CONTENTE was born in Ribeirinha, Pico, in 1857, the son of Jose and Anna do Rosario Silva Contente. Jose was born in 1805. Both remained in Pico with their daughter Virginia when Joseph immigrated to the United States under the age of 18, according to his U.S. citizenship affidavit dated February 8, 1910. He reached the Clarksburg area of Yolo County in 1872 at the age of 15, and went to work for farmers there.

His brother, MANUEL SILVA CONTENTE, also came to the area, settling in the Glide area of Yolo County. They were joined by a sister, MARIA SILVA CONTENTE. Manuel married a German woman, Amelia Heiser, who learned to speak Portuguese fluently. Her brothers farmed near Babel Slough, and Manuel and Amelia made their home there. Mary Silva Contente married TOMAS Da ROSA, who changed his name to Thomas, and settled on his ranch south of the Freeport Ferry in Yolo County.

Joseph Contente married RITA SILVEIRA BITTENCOURT of the Clarksburg area in 1886 when he was 29 years old and she was 15. She was born in Clarksburg near the area where

the IDES Hall is located. (See BITTENCOURT.)

For 16 years Rita and Joseph made their home on the hall grounds, up by the levee. There seven of their children were born. Their oldest daughter, Mamie Contente Rose, mother of Ernest A. Rose, used to remark that they lived on what was believed to be a Miwok Indian burial mound. The Contente children would play and dig holes at the side of the levee, finding Indian beads and other artifacts. They witnessed many floods while living in Yolo County. By 1902 they moved across the river to Freeport, buying one acre with a barn about a half-mile south of the Freeport Ferry and town of Freeport.

They moved into the barn, glad to have a roof over their heads. As time went on Rita struggled to tack bed sheets to the ceiling "to catch dust coming through the roof," and to lessen the summer heat and winter cold. Meanwhile, Joseph improved the building when time permitted, dividing it into four rooms, enclosing the ceiling, adding closets, windows and doors, a front and back porch, and even a ventilation window over the front door. Then he dug out a basement, with a dirt floor. It was cool for storage and for keeping his wine barrels.

There was a water well with a hand pump outside the kitchen door. The outhouse was set up at the far end of the yard. As years went by, a septic tank was installed by the Contente sons, and running water was pumped into the house with the help of a gasoline engine. The wood stove was used for cooking and heating.

The last three Contente children were born there. Son Alfred inherited the house, which remains today south of old Freeport town. He made some changes inside, but restorations were made with the same old lumber. It still has the old-fashioned cupboards, antique table with tin flour and sugar bins beneath, and the original locks on the closet doors just as Joseph Contente had installed them. The wood stove is instact and still useable. Alfred added a bathroom where the outside porch was.

Joseph Silva Contente worked several years for the Southern Pacific Railroad as a laborer with a section gang, laying down new ties and rails from about 1910 on. The freight trains would stop at the levee in front of the Contente home to load up commodities for delivery to Sacramento, and Joseph at times rode along with the loaded trains. The train stop came to be known by the neighbors as the "Contente Station."

He was musically inclined, as were his children. Off they would go up and down the levee and across the river by ferry from house to house playing music and singing, blowing horns, hitting tin cans for New Years Eve and Mardi Gras, with more and more young people joining them along the way. Usually the ladies remained at home, welcoming the celebrants with food treats and wine, over-indulgence by some making it a bit difficult to return home.

Rita Contente was a very active, hard working and independent lady. She never drove a vehicle, but got around well by riding the train which passed by her house. Later on she would board a stage that drove by enroute to Sacramento. There she would ride the streetcars, transferring to different areas. She made such trips periodically to visit her sisters and family and to do her shopping. She sewed a lot, her hobby being quilt-making. She made dozens of them, giving them to all her children and to others as gifts. She was a terrific cook, turning out delicious pies, cakes, puddings, biscoitos, sweet bread, roasts and turkey dressings on her wood stove. For the most part the heating gage on the oven didnt work, but results were great anyway.

Joseph became fully Americanized, and always spoke fluent English at home, which was quite unusual in those years. He also had a beautiful handwriting. Rita was too busy taking care of the children, so Joseph took care of the little details like listing the births of his children in a little brown book. After the birth of each child Joseph would call in his friends and offer a feast of food and homemade wine.

Joseph Silva Contente died on October 28, 1929, at age 72; Rita died on February 14, 1956, at 84 years. In addition to the aforementioned Manuel and Mary, other Contente siblings were Tony, John, and Virginia. Rita had three brothers and three sisters: John, Manuel, Joseph, Mary (Silva), Frances (Fonts), and Philomena "Minnie" Bittencourt Soto. The children of Joseph and Rita Contente:

MARY ALOYSIUS CONTENTE (Mamie) married ANTHONY FRANK ROSE, who carried the mail from the Freeport Post Office to the Sacramento Post Office at 7th and K Streets. He was also a barber in Freeport and in Sacramento at 1624 Q Street, and played the clarinet with the Camellia City Band. Their children: Ernest Anthony Rose and Lillian Rose Black.

DENA CONTENTE married FRANK MARTIN BORBA, an orchardist in Newcastle. He performed at the Chamarritas. Children: Alvin, Lorrene (Nicholas), and Marceal (Calava).

EMILY CONTENTE (Amelia) married TONY LOVERDE, who operated a small hotel and restaurant in Freeport, and then a saloon in Sacramento. Emily helped with her husbands businesses. Children: Elwyn and Allan Loverde.

Joseph CONTENTE Jr., a bachelor, worked for Southern Pacific Railroad as a track-walker foreman in the Freeport area, and then as an oil-tender car repairman.

BILL CONTENTE married Rena Cortopassi of Stockton. He worked with haypresses and drove Caterpillars in Natomas; in canneries, where he met his wife; and then worked in wineries, first in Lodi, and then in Fresno with Roma Winery Co. He was a cooper, bought wine barrels, and then became a supervisor. Rena also worked in school cafeterias. They settled in Fresno. Their children: Eugene, Erlene, Adele, William Jr., Betty, and Rita.

ANNA M. CONTENTE married Gradyon Austin of West Sacramento, a furniture finisher who worked for Hale Bros. furniture department in Sacramento. Anna crocheted and was a proficient dressmaker and seamstress, doing alterations for the dress departments of stores. They lived in North Sacramento. They had one son, Denzile Austin.

ALFRED CONTENTE married Beatrice Pane. He worked as a ranch hand then served an apprenticeship with Southern Pacific Railroad, becoming a molder in the brass, steel and iron foundry. In later years he was a custodian for the Sacramento schools. He was also an accomplished carpenter. Beatrice worked for many years for the California Almond Growers. They had one daughter, Jeanette Contente Hoover.

CLARENCE CONTENTE attended the Freeport School and was in high school when stricken with spinal meningitis at the age of 17. He died February 22, 1927.

Philomena, Joseph's twin, and Amelia died in infancy.

Several of the children were accomplished musicians. Mary taught piano and also played the organ; Dena played piano, as did Emily; Joseph Jr. and Bill played the accordian.

[Grace M. Rose; Alfred Contente; Anna Contente Austin; Mary A. Rose; Ernest A. Rose]

MANUEL COQUIM Jr., the son of Manuel and Victorina (Anastacio) Coquim, was called to California by his father from Gafanha da Cal da Vila, Ilhavo, Portugal, in 1920, at the age of 17. The senior Manuel Coquim then returned to Portugal and took the rest of the family to Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Manuel Jr. lived and worked on farms in the Delta around Ryer Island, Terminous, and Sherman Island. At one time he worked for a Chinese farmer, Lee Chong, driving plow horses, tractor and trucks. He also worked for Mr. Zacharias, whom many called "Jack Rice" because of the difficulty pronouncing his name.

Sebastiao Anastacio, Victorina's brother, and Sebastiaos son Alvaro, also worked at Ryer Island. Sebastiao died in an automobile accident in 1939. Alvaro, called Oliver, was in the insurance business in San Jose, and died in the 1960s.

Manuel Coquim Jr. met TERESA SECO while working for Antonio Louro at Staten Island. Teresa was helping her mother cook and keep house for Mr. Louro. They married in 1932 at St. Elizabeth's Church and settled in Sacramento, where Manuel worked on farms until going to work for Western Pacific Railroad, and Teresa worked seasonally in the canneries. She also worked at Shasta Laundry and then Campbell Soup Company until she retired when Manuel did in the late 1960s. They had two children, Victorina and Marilia.

Teresa was the daughter of MARIA CANDIDA NUNE and ANTONE SECO. Maria came to Sacramento from Urros, Portugal, at about age 25 as the proxy bride of Antone, who was left widowed with three young sons when his wife, Barbara, died. Barbara and Maria were cousins. Antone and Barbara had also come from Urros.

Antone, Maria's husband, died in a drowning accident when Teresa was about three weeks old, leaving Maria, who spoke no English, with a tiny baby and three young stepsons, Albert, Manuel Joseph Joe), and Abelio (Bill). She resorted to working in canneries, cooking for weddings and gatherings, taking in laundry, and doing housekeeping. She and the children lived in the area around Southside Park known as "Arizona." Maria was very grateful to Mrs. Hopley, principal at Lincoln School, for helping with clothing for the children.

Maria Candida Nune Seco, mother of Teresa Seco Coquim Jr., later married John CORREA and moved to Niles, and there had another daughter, Filomena (Minnie), before returning to Sacramento. She divorced John Correa and went back to work in the canneries and again as a housekeeper, this time for Joaquim Santos, who farmed in the Natomas area. When Santos retired and returned to Portugal, Maria moved in with her daughter Minnie. Maria died in 1958. Two of her stepsons, Joe and Bill, died, and Albert at this writing, age 87, was residing in a care home in Gait.

[Marilia Coquim Wiget]

ANTONE COREY (Antone Correira Machado) was born in 1850 in Pico, and came to America about 1891 or 1892, also bringing his mother who lived with him until she died. Antone married MARY ENOS, born 1856, sister of John Enos from town, who also was from Pico. They settled in the Riverside area in a home across the road from the Frank Enos home and gas station.

Antone and Mary's children were: Manuel, Tony, Mary, John, Lucille, Frank and George. Another Mary died as an infant. All the children except George were born in the Azores. Son Tony was part-owner of the Greyhound Taxi in the 1930s.

Antone Corey died July 5, 1917, at age 67; Mary died in 1950 at age 94.

John COREY, son of Antone and Mary, was born November 24, 1886, in Pico. In the early 1910s he lived and worked on the dredge Argyle for Captain Manuel Brown. It was there that he met MINNIE PERRY, born April 25, 1896, just 15, who was the daughter of Antone and Amelia Perry of the Pocket. She had traveled with her family to Tudor near Marysville to visit her uncle Capt. Frank Bettencourt, who also captained a dredge.

Aboard the Argyle she observed a very handsome young man at the top of the boom oiling the pully. She asked someone who he was and was told his name was John Corey. She waited until he came down to meet him. A romance followed and they married when she was 17-1/2 on November 9, 1913. Her father had said she couldn't marry until she was 18, but he relented.

They first made their home with his parents in the Riverside area, theparents upstairs and they downstairs. John worked for John Enos who had a lumber yard and also contracted with the city to clean city streets with sprinkler trucks. John drove one of the trucks at the time of his marriage. Minnie took on the job of washing the clothes of the workers of the Seamas Granger's Dairy, charging by the piece.

John farmed in partnership with his father-in-law, Antone Perry, farming the Antone Souza and the Williams ranches. Bad farming years necessitated terminating the partnership. During this time John and Minnie lived in small houses on the Souza and Williams ranches provided for the farm help.

John went to work for the Brickyard and they lived in one of the four-room homes which were clustered together and rented to Brickyard employees for seven dollars a month.

Minnie and John returned to the Argyle with Minnie as cook and John again as part of the crew. Capt. Brown and his wife taught Minnie the routine for three days before she was on her own. Using a large butcher block she was taught how to butcher the quartered beef and how to cut the meat for cooking. Making $80 a month, she cooked for 28 men at one time 14 crewmen and for a time the 14 men who were repairing the Argyle. She had to get up at four in the morning to start the days cooking making bread, pies and preparing the three full meals, and a midnight meal for the night crew. Food also had to be available for in-between snacks for the hardworking men. Her workday ended very late after cleanup, which John helped her with. She cooked for nine months before they left.

They again returned to the Pocket where they both went to work for John Silva John Maria). John worked with the horses which he loved, and Minnie again as a cook for the haypress crew. The cookhouse was portable and was moved from ranch to ranch along with the machinery and crew. Sometimes it was being moved while Minnie was cooking.

They then moved to Modesto for about a year, he as a farmhand and she as a cook at $50 a month. Farmhands from other ranches came to eat also. They would be charged ten cents per meal, so Minnie would make sometimes $80, and at one time she made as much as $96 a month.

About 1919 they returned to Sacramento and both worked at the Libby Cannery at 31st (now Alhambra) and P Streets. They lived in the four-room cluster houses provided for the workers on the north and east sides of the cannery. The work was seasonal.

John worked one year and Minnie worked 24 seasons, until 1940, when she retired. They lived in the company houses until 1921 when they bought a home in the Fruitridge area.

In 1920 John joined the Southern Pacific and worked as switch tender for 36 years until he retired in 1956. He died April 11, 1963. Minnie sold their home in 1969 and moved into a senior citizens complex. They had no children.

Minnie had also worked at the Peerless Cracker Co. on about 25th and Y Streets (now Broadway) for about a year, along with many other Portuguese women. As a girl of 15 she worked in the hop fields on the Merkeley ranch which was located next to the Alvernaz ranch and behind the King Brown ranch in the Riverside area. There also were hop fields across the river where young people earned money by picking hops. They would have to be rowed across the river in the morning and then rowed back again in the late afternoon. Minnie worked two seasons in the hops.

Minnie died in 1989 at age 93. At the time she was living in a small house behind the home of her brother, Lawrence Perry, in the Pocket area.

[Minnie Perry Corey]

Joseph KING CORREA, SR., one of the earliest Portuguese pioneers in Placer County, was born March 1831 in Sao Jorge, the Azores. His parents died while he was quite young. He had a fair education in the Azores, and then at age 13 put to sea on a whaling ship, where he became a cook.

He first touched American shores in Boston, where he worked and went to night school. He eventually reached California and San Francisco by way of the Horn in 1851 during the Gold Rush. He soon pushed on to the Newcastle area, where he had a crew of gold miners in Dutch Ravine hard at work according to the old flume system. He later mined in the same way at Rattlesnake Bar, and also at Yankee Jims, near Forest Hill.

Having made a stake, he visited his old home in the Azores, and on his return to Placer County married MARY AMELIA NUNES of Flores in August 1865. They had seven children: Joseph K. Jr., Frank, Manuel, William, Mary, Amelia, and Minnie. Mary E. married Thomas F. Perry; Amelia married John Soto; and Minnie married A. J. Silva.

On her trip to California by way of the Isthmus of Panama, Mary Nunes Correa's ship was wrecked on the Atlantic side, and they were three days on an island before they were rescued.

They settled in Dutch Ravine where J. K. Correa built a large home on 80 acres purchased from the Government. There he raised goats, and then he embarked in orcharding, being one of the very first to start fruit-raising. While the trees were growing, he planted berries between the rows, and so realized some immediate returns for his labor.

One day while mining on his ranch in Dutch Ravine, he was throwing rocks from the flume and tossed out one that seemed very heavy for its size, and afterwards he remembered that it looked rather yellow. The thought bothered him, and later he climbed the bank and discovered that it was a large gold nugget. A small piece had broken off, worth $85, while the nugget weighed in at a value of more than $1,000.

He lived to age 90, and died January 7, 1921, survived by his widow, four children, 26 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Joseph KING CORREA, Jr., attended school at Newcastle. When a boy of seven years he sold fruit at the Southern Pacific depot in Newcastle to the passengers. He would carry the fruit in eight or ten boxes (strawberry size) from his father's ranch almost a mile away, and meet the passenger trains bound east and west, and then run home to bring more for the next train. Sometimes he would find on his return home that some passenger by mistake had given him a $2.50 gold piece in place of a dime, the two coins being of about the same size.

Much later he headed up his father's business.

He owned 14 acres of land adjoining Newcastle on the northwest, 40 acres near Auburn, and 16 acres between Grass Valley and Colfax. In addition, he and his wife held title to some 60 acres of the Moran estate, to which Mrs. Correa fell heir. He also owned some property in San Francisco.

He built the Subway Garage in Newcastle in 1919, had the agency for the Oldsmobile car, his headquarters being the Subway Garage; and also engaged in the real estate and insurance business. He took a contract to build two and a half miles of road on a difficult grade through Dutch Ravine, just out of Newcastle, which he completed in a year.

In 1914 he was elected supervisor of District No. 2 for a four-year term beginning January 1915.

He married Anna W. Moran of Ophir on November 30, 1892. Their four children: William E., Marguerite (Mrs. Gordon) Webber, Laurene, and Walter, the latter becoming general manager of the Lincoln Fruit Growers' Association.

[History of Placer and Nevada Counties, 1924]

HENRY COSTA was born November 9, 1876, in Sacramento, one of eight children of Antonio and Bernarda Amelia Costa. His father Antonio was a pioneer employee of the Southern Pacific Co., and worked for them 30 years. He died in Sacramento on July 20, 1907, at age 90. Henrys mother died on November 12, 1878, in Sacramento at age 44, when Henry was two years old.

The other Costa children were George, Joseph, Michael, Frank, Antonio, Mary, and Annie. Antonio and Annie were twins. Most of them were sent to orphanages in San Rafael and South San Francisco, as their father was away working for the railroad and unable to care for them.

Henry, who was baptized November 17, 1876, was brought up by his godparents, Frank and Maria (Laura) Governor, in Yolo County. On January 6, 1901, he married VICTORIA IRENE SOTO, daughter of John and Frances (Dutra) Soto. They had two daughters: Evelyn Violet (1902-1957), and Mildred Agnes, born January 21, 1909.

Henry worked on the Manuel Soto farm on Holland Island in Yolo County. Later he worked on the Smith & Rydell ranch in Yolo County, and became their superintendent. Then he farmed for himself on Grand Island.

Later, Henry and Victoria moved into the ranch house owned by her parents on the River Road in the Lisbon District, and Henry operated the Freeport Ferry which his mother-in-law owned. (See Chapter 10 about the ferries.) When the Freeport bridge was built in 1929, Henry became the first bridge tender. He walked to work until he and Victoria moved to Sacramento in April 1942. Then, not wanting his car exposed to the elements, he moved a garage up on the levee near the bridge on the Freeport side of the river.

In 1939, when he was 63 years old, Henry saw his sister, Ann Sternberg of Seattle, for their first reunion since they were separated as children.

Henry and Victoria celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in January 1951. He retired as bridgetender in August 1954. He died January 21, 1957, at age 81, in Sacramento. Victoria died July 15, 1976, at 95 years of age, in Sacramento.

[Fleurette Rogers]

MANUEL COSTA was born in Santo Amaro, Pico, in 1911, the oldest of six children. He arrived in New York on the ship Boga in April 1921 at age ten, and traveled to California to Natomas to live with John and Rose Silva and their children. When Manuels father died, Rose Silva wrote to her sister, Manuel's mother, to send the oldest child and she would raise him. He attended Jefferson School on San Juan Road not far from where he lived. When he finished school he worked with his cousins on the ranch.

In 1934 he married EMILY FRATES and went into farming for himself on El Centro Road. Their children: Ted, Ronald, William, and Richard Costa. Three generations of Costas continued living in Natomas.

[Mary Ferreira Rosa]

FRANK De COSTA was born 1834 in the Azores, coming to America at an early age and becoming a whaler in New Bedford. He met MARY ROMANA De COSTA (same surname), born in Horta, Faial, in 1851. They married in Boston when she was 16. They returned to the Azores for a visit and their oldest son Arthur was born there. They returned to Boston for a while before sailing around the Horn to San Francisco.

They came to Sacramento and lived with her sister Louisa "Annie" King and her hus-

band Antone on a ranch near the Brickyard. Their children were Arthur, Joseph, Frank and Manuel. Manuel died of tuberculosis February 20, 1900 at age 23. Frank De Costa died in 1876

shortly after his youngest child Manuel was born and Arthur was six years old.

Bernarda Delphina De Costa, Mary Romana's widowed mother, was from Horta and came to Boston with Mary Romana and did domestic work. Little by little she sent for each child from Horta. She had had 12 children but by the time she became widowed she had only five living: Mary Romana, Louisa Coelho, Joseph, Frank and Capatelena (Lena), all eventually coming to California and settling in various places, some in Sacramento.

Bernarda settled in downtown Sacramento with the youngest daughter Lena, who married Stephen Farley, proprietor of the 12th Street Enterprize Store, a grocery, located at the corner of 12th and F Streets.

Mary Romana returned to Boston after Frank died and lived there about a year before returning to Sacramento. About a year later she married Joseph PETERS, widower with four children. Mary Romana DeCosta Peters died October 2, 1938, age 87. The children of Mary Romana and Joseph Peters were: William, Carrie, and Domingues, who died at eight months. Joseph Peters died November 7, 1917. Frank De Costa, Mary Romana De Costa Peters, and Joseph Peters share the same plot at St. Josephs cemetery along with five other family members.

Joseph Peters was born in 1831 in Sao Jorge. He had been a miner and came to Sacramento in 1851 and became a riverboat captain with the Sacramento Transportation Company pater River Lines), one of the 13 captains who founded the company. Later he worked for the Southern Pacific Co., and Mary Romana took in borders to help with finances. Son William Peters was a captain in the Sacramento Fire Dept. and was killed while fighting a fire in 1937.

[Romana Vieira]

MORRIS S. DAGGETT, SR. was born October 18, 1851, in Sao Jorge, the son of John Silveira Agueda and the former Maria Rose Lemos. He jumped ship in San Francisco and went to the gold fields around Yuba City and Marysville, and while mining there he met a priest, Father Serafim Soares, who talked him into sending for the priests sister, MARIAN SOARES, whom Morris later married. She was born in 1870 in Pico.

They moved to Hawkinsville, Calif., until the gold gave out there, and then home-steaded up the Klamath River at a place now called Copco. After ranching there a while they moved to Clarksburg. Morris Dagget died on April 17, 1929; his wife, Marian, died in 1952 in Sacramento.

The children of Morris and Marian:

Mary Daggett, who married Tony Soares, and had a child, Morris D. Soares; Gabriel Andrew Daggett, who married Mary Cardoza, and had children Lenora, Mary, and Gabriel; John Daggett, who with his wife Ida had children Margery and Jackie; and Morris Soares Daggett II, who married Thelma Walters, and had one girl and two boys, Gabriel and Morris.

Morris and Thelma Daggett together operated the Sacramento Memorial Mortuary on Stockton Boulevard, successor to the Morris S. Daggett Funeral Home in downtown Sacramento. Morris Daggett died May 2A, 1977. His widow sold Sacramento Memorial in 1989. When Thelma and Morris married there were five priests in the wedding ceremony.

[Gabriel A. Daggett; Thelma Daggett]

ANTONE DAMIAO (his correct name was Damiao Antonio, and he was also known variously as Antone Damion and Damion Antone) immigrated to America around 1879 from Cais do Pico, the island of Pico, where he was born in 1852. He and his wife, the former ROSA ALVERNAZ, owned a small farm in the Lisbon District of Yolo County one mile upstream from St. Josephs Catholic Church in Clarksburg, later owned by William Correa, Jr. They grew grain, alfalfa, onions, cabbage, potatoes, and other vegetables. Produce was delivered to the A. Levy and J. Zentner produce house in Sacramento by horse and wagon, an all-day trip. Damiao also did some blacksmithing.

Antone had been married before, to ANNIE SILVA, and out of that marriage came children Minnie, Nancy and Rose, some of whom changed the spelling to Damian, others kept the name Antone. They were raised by their stepmother, Rosa Alvernaz Damiao, who died May 23, 1960, at 89. (See ALVERNAZ.)

MINNIE DAMION, was born on the Lisbon District farm. She married MANUEL BALIEL and the two lived with Manuel's parents on their farm in the same area. They had 11 children. (See BALIEL.)

NANCY ANTONE (apparently she adopted her fathers real name), married MANUEL CORREA, and they had children Irene, Walter, William (Bill), and Manuel M. (Bert) Correa. Irene married Joe Alamo. Walter married Belmeda Valine, daughter of John P. and Mary Valine. Bill married Isabel DuVall, the daughter of Manuel J. and Margaret A. (Roque) DuVall. Bill and Isabel had a daughter, Bevery Jean, who married Paul Salazar. Bert married Josephine Joseph, daughter of John and Frances Joseph, and had a son, Howard Correa.

ROSE DAMION (or Antone) married Joe COREY, and had four children, Joe Jr., Lillian, Ethel, and Mary.

[Adeline Baliel Nevis; newspaper funeral notices]

DANIEL (DIONIZ) DENNIS was born October 29, 1895, in Ribeirinha, Pico, Azores, the son of Manuel Quaresma Pimentel and Maria de Jesus (Cedros) Pimentel. His father worked as a shoemaker. Daniel was given the name Dioniz after his paternal grandfather. He had three brothers and two sisters.

Daniel came to America at an early age to live in the Mills area east of Sacramento with his sister Dina, who was employed as a domestic and who had already immigrated from the Azores. Dina was later to marry Frank L. Terra, a Sacramento building contractor. Daniel graduated from grammar school as Dioniz D'Avila, taking his paternal grandparents' surname.

He moved to Glenn County in June 1915 and worked on a ranch. At age 16 he moved back to Sacramento and became a stable boy for the U.S. Cavalry, which had a detachment near Mather Field. At 17 Daniel changed his surname to Dennis in his naturalization process and joined the U.S. Army Air Corps. He was assigned to Mather Field as a company clerk and stenographer in a squadron which served during World War I.

After being honorably discharged with unit commendation he became employed as a bookkeeper with a company doing reclamation work and levee building along the Sacramento River. He then became Postmaster at Walnut Grove. While working there he met and married Gladys Maybelle Hensley, who was a secretary at the Bank of Alex Brown in Walnut Grove. Two sons were born to them, Daniel "Dean" Jr., and Kenneth.

Daniel decided to go into law so began studying nights at the Sacramento College of Law at 10th and J Streets. The law school later became McGeorge School of Law. He passed the State Bar examination on June 12, 1925, and opened his law practice that same year. His office was located in the Capital National Bank Building on 7th and J Streets. A great portion of Daniel's practice was with the Portuguese community in Sacramento and the Delta towns.

In the early 1950s he moved to Douglas City, Trinity County, where he made his home with his third wife. He practiced law there until he became ill, forcing his retirement. He died August 23, 1989.

Daniel was an avid hunter and fisherman and loved the outdoors. He was a charter member of the American Portuguese Club and also a member of the Sheriffs Posse.

His oldest brother Manuel Dionisio was educated in Faial and became a scholar, author and professor. He wrote a book entitled Costumes Acoreanos, which was published in paperback in 1937 and distributed in the United States.

[Kenneth Dennis; Dolores Silva Greenslate]

FRANCISCO RODRIGUES DIAS was born September 22, 1884, the son of Francisco Rodrigues Dias and Cecilia Mariana Dias of Candelaria, Pico. He came to the United States sometime prior to 1920, going first to the San Jose area where he worked for several years in a brick factory. He had been a blacksmith in Pico. In 1920, with $10,000 saved from his work in San Jose, he returned to the Azores and married FRANCISCA LUIZA DIAS, daughter of Joao Rodrigues Dias and Maria Luiza Dias. Francisca was born March 3, 1883.

The same year of their marriage both returned to California, settling in the Newcastle area where Francisco purchased a fruit ranch on the Newcastle-Lincoln road for $14,000 in 1920, keeping half of the acreage for fruit and uprooting the trees from the other half for farming. Having been a blacksmith in the Azores, he often turned his skill to repairing wheels and other ranch equipment for his friends and neighbors.

Francisco died of pneumonia June 3, 1933 in Newcastle. His widow tried to manage the ranch by herself with some hired help, but it was at the time of the Depression, and it was difficult. She sold the property and in December 1936 returned to Pico with her ten-year-old son Francisco (Frank). She died in Angra, Terceira, in 1965.

Frank Rodrigues Dias Jr. was born in Newcastle on September 22, 1926, and attended the local school. He was in the first grade when his father died.

He attended school in Pico, where he had gone with his mother, and then moved to Faial in 1943, where he worked in a department store in Horta, and also did some occasional interpreting for the American consul whenever the crew of American ships in the Horta harbor got into trouble with the Portuguese authorities.

Having reached age 19, he was about to be drafted into the Portuguese army in 1945, and in fact had his induction physical. But the army authorities initially said he was too skinny to be a soldier. He then made preparations to return to America, but meanwhile he had met Mary Alice Dias. She was born in Sao Sebastiao, Terceira, the daughter of Joao Maria Silva and Maria Neves of Prainha Norte do Pico. She lived in Ribeirinha, Pico, at ages one and two, and then moved to Horta. They married November 9, 1946.

She stayed in Faial when Frank returned to Sacramento on November 4, 1947, where he worked at Weinstocks at 12th and K Streets for four months before going to work for the California Department of Motor Vehicles on January 14, 1948. Mary joined him in Sacramento in October 1948.

Franks radio career with Ecos de Portugal, which began on January 7, 1968, is told in Chapter 16. For his activites with the Sacramento Portuguese-American community he was made an Officer of the Order of Benemerencia and decorated by Dr. Mario Soares, President of Portugal, on June 10, 1986.

Among his many services to the Portuguese was his suggestion which resulted in publication of the California Driver's Manual in Portuguese. He served as president of ODES in 1966, and was the first president of SPHSS and chairman of the hall construction committee.

[Frank Dias]

John DIAS, SR. was one of five children whose parents came from Madeira. His mother was the former Mary Gomes. John's siblings were Joe, who died around 1973; Tony, who also died around 1973; Manuel, who died around 1974 and lived in Bryte; and Julia, who married Anthony Sousa.

John married PAULINE AMARAL who was from Agualva, Terceira. Her siblings included Mary Cordeira, John Amaral, and Carmelita Sylvia.

John and Pauline first lived in the Taunton, Mass., area, doing farm work, and upon coming to the Sacramento area had a Grade A dairy of 75 cows around Florin and Bradshaw. They had previously lived in the Natomas area, working on farms there.

John died in 1963, Pauline on September 27, 1979, at age 78. Their children: John Dias Jr., who married Hilda Lopes; Tony Dias, who died in 1978 at age 45, and whose wife name was Shirley; Alfred, who was a fireman in Florin; and Margaret, whose first husband was LeRoy Simas.

[John Dias Jr.]

Joseph XAVIER DIAS, Jr. was born in 1860 in Massachusetts, one of five children of Joseph Xavier Dias of Faial and Antonia (Antonette) Amelia da Roza of Piedade, Pico. The senior Dias, who died June 20, 1925 at age 78, was the brother of Mary Vincent, Grace Murray, and Angelina Dias.

Young Joseph came to Sacramento at age nine in 1869. He married Annie L. Stowers, daughter of Daniel McGushin and the former Katherine Maxwell, natives of Ireland. Joseph and Annie resided at 1924 3rd Street, and had six children: Earl, Bart, Goldie, Evelyn, Lillian, and William.

An engineer at Sacramento County Hospital for 23 years, Joseph also invested in real estate, buying and selling properties throughout the city. One family story has him buying the Liberty and Capitol theaters in Sacramento for $10 and reselling them for a $20 gold piece. Joseph and his daughter Goldie operated two grocery stores in Sacramento at one time, and in fact sold to Manuel Machado the store at 5th and T which became the Machado Grocery.

Daughter GOLDIE MAY DIAS married MANUEL J. VIERA. She died October 28, 1974 at age 81, and Manuel in 1933 at age 50. They had one child, Manuel J. Viera Jr.

EVELYN DIAS married twice, to a Mr. LaFrance, and to a Mr. Manuel, by whom she had two children, Darlene Manuel and J.d. Manuel.

LILLIAN DIAS married Lee Harrington, and WILLIAM J. DIAS died in 1939 at age 48.

[Newspaper obituary; Rickie Dias]

MANUEL PEREIRA DIAS was born on September 16, 1902 in Sao Rogue, Pico, the son of Joao and Felesidade Dias. He came to America as a youth of about 19 or 20, and settled in the Sacramento area. His first job was as a sheepherder. He then became a hay baler, and worked on haypresses on Natomas and Pocket ranches.

He was a wiry youth, with enormous hands, and was known for his great strength. He was reported to have whipped five men at one time at the White Front Cafe. According to an account by Ken Dennis quoted in Kirt MacBride's Sacramento Union column, Manuel Dias took two three-wire bales, one in each hand, over his head and put them up through the outside opening to the hay loft of the barn, both at the same time. Johnny Azevedo, a manager of boxers at the L Street Arena, wanted to groom Manuel as a boxer, but he found the sport unappealing, although he did have a fight in Woodland. His career was short-lived.

214 - Portuguese Pioneers of the Sacramento Area

John DIAS, SR. was one of five children whose parents came from Madeira. His mother was the former Mary Gomes. John's siblings were Joe, who died around 1973; Tony, who also died around 1973; Manuel, who died around 1974 and lived in Bryte; and Julia, who married Anthony Sousa.

John married PAULINE AMARAL who was from Agualva, Terceira. Her siblings included Mary Cordeira, John Amaral, and Carmelita Sylvia.

John and Pauline first lived in the Taunton, Mass., area, doing farm work, and upon coming to the Sacramento area had a Grade A dairy of 75 cows around Florin and Bradshaw. They had previously lived in the Natomas area, working on farms there.

John died in 1963, Pauline on September 27, 1979, at age 78. Their children: John Dias Jr., who married Hilda Lopes; Tony Dias, who died in 1978 at age 45, and whose wife name was Shirley; Alfred, who was a fireman in Florin; and Margaret, whose first husband was LeRoy Simas.

[John Dias Jr.]

Joseph XAVIER DIAS, Jr. was born in 1860 in Massachusetts, one of five children of Joseph Xavier Dias of Faial and Antonia (Antonette) Amelia da Roza of Piedade, Pico. The senior Dias, who died June 20, 1925 at age 78, was the brother of Mary Vincent, Grace Murray, and Angelina Dias.

Young Joseph came to Sacramento at age nine in 1869. He married Annie L. Stowers, daughter of Daniel McGushin and the former Katherine Maxwell, natives of Ireland. Joseph and Annie resided at 1924 3rd Street, and had six children: Earl, Bart, Goldie, Evelyn, Lillian, and William.

An engineer at Sacramento County Hospital for 23 years, Joseph also invested in real estate, buying and selling properties throughout the city. One family story has him buying the Liberty and Capitol theaters in Sacramento for $10 and reselling them for a $20 gold piece. Joseph and his daughter Goldie operated two grocery stores in Sacramento at one time, and in fact sold to Manuel Machado the store at 5th and T which became the Machado Grocery.

Daughter GOLDIE MAY DIAS married MANUEL J. VIERA. She died October 28, 1974 at age 81, and Manuel in 1933 at age 50. They had one child, Manuel J. Viera Jr.

EVELYN DIAS married twice, to a Mr. LaFrance, and to a Mr. Manuel, by whom she had two children, Darlene Manuel and J.d. Manuel.

LILLIAN DIAS married Lee Harrington, and WILLIAM J. DIAS died in 1939 at age 48.

[Newspaper obituary; Rickie Dias]

MANUEL PEREIRA DIAS was born on September 16, 1902 in Sao Rogue, Pico, the son of Joao and Felesidade Dias. He came to America as a youth of about 19 or 20, and settled in the Sacramento area. His first job was as a sheepherder. He then became a hay baler, and worked on haypresses on Natomas and Pocket ranches.

He was a wiry youth, with enormous hands, and was known for his great strength. He was reported to have whipped five men at one time at the White Front Cafe. According to an account by Ken Dennis quoted in Kirt MacBride's Sacramento Union column, Manuel Dias took two three-wire bales, one in each hand, over his head and put them up through the outside opening to the hay loft of the barn, both at the same time. Johnny Azevedo, a manager of boxers at the L Street Arena, wanted to groom Manuel as a boxer, but he found the sport unappealing, although he did have a fight in Woodland. His career was short-lived.

In Sacramento Manuel met AMELIA FURTADO, who was born in Ribeirinha, Pico, the daughter of Joao Silveira and Maria Jacinta Furtado. Manuel and Amelia married on January 1, 1925, and lived both in Natomas and the Pocket/Riverside areas while Manuel worked on the haypresses and in farming. Manuel and Jack Silva, son of a pioneer farmer of the Pocket, became partners for three years in a farming venture, leasing land in the Pocket and Natomas around 1930 where they raised crops and sugar beets.

He joined Manuel Paulino in 1933 as a partner in the White Front Cafe at 1022 4th Street, between J and K Streets. The partnership was dissolved around 1939 when the business was sold.

Manuel Dias then moved to San Francisco and worked in the Mare Island shipyard from 1939 to 1944. He then moved to San Diego and became a fisherman, working on the tuna boats. Later, around 1948, he became chief engineer on a marine geological survey ship based in San Diego, and remained in that capacity until his death in 1961 at age 59.

The children of Manuel and Amelia: Robert, Mary Lou, and Manuel, Jr.

Manuel and Amelia divorced in 1936, and Manuel married Elinore Schmidt around 1940, living most of their married years in San Diego.

[Robert Dias; Amelia Furtado Dias]

Joe DUARTE (Jose Furtado Duarte) was born April 12, 1899, in Pedro Miguel, Faial.

He immigrated to the United States on the SS Roma and entered the port of Providence, R.I., on May 11, 1920. He worked in a hospital and two years later sent for his wife and children, who arrived in Providence on July 5, 1922. On July 29, 1917, at Pedro Miguel, he had married MARIA da GLORIA ALVES, born November 3, 1899, in the same village.

Joe took his family to California in 1923, going first to Petaluma. In the mid-1920s he ran a dairy in Clarksburg, and then moved to Tracy where he milked cows for his cousin.

He moved to Placer County in 1930 and worked on fruit ranches as a tenant farmer. Between harvesting of fruit and pruning of trees he also worked at the Portland Cement Co. rock quarry in the American River canyon, as did many other Portuguese men.

In the early 1940s he bought a fruit ranch in the Loomis basin. He was naturalized on December 10, 1941. Joe died March 9, 1968, and Maria on April 13, 1985. Both are entombed at Calvary Cemetery in Sacramento.

Two of their children were born in Faial, Joseph A. Duarte on September 23, 1918, and Frank A. Duarte on February 24, 1920. Son George A. Duarte was born in Hayward on July 3, 1929, daughter Mary Louise on December 15, 1931 in Newcastle, and the youngest son, George A. Duarte, on February 16, 1937 in Auburn. Joe Duarte Jr. married Gloria Isabel Veiga.

[Joe Duarte Jr.; Aileen Alves Gage]

ANTONE PERRY DUTRA (nicknamed "Peru" Portuguese for turkey because he raised the fowl), was born April 13, 1880 in Faial. He left there for America as a seaman at the age of 17 to avoid being drafted into military service. Antone jumped ship when he arrived in New York and was met by his brothers John and Manuel. They had come to America for the same reason. John and Manuel took Antone to Rhode Island, where he stayed for four years, working as a milker and handyman.

He left for California by train and arrived in Sacramento about 1901. He went to work for Manuel Seamas' Granger's Dairy in the Pocket as a milker and handyman, and for Frank J. Lewis Sr., who later became his father-in-law.

In 1907 he bought ten acres in the Pocket near the pumping station from Manuel Peters and raised tomatoes, onions, cabbage and spinach. He sold his produce to Wood Curtis and Levi Zentner companies.

In 1908 Antone married LOUISE FLORENCE LEWIS, daughter of Frank J. Lewis Sr. and Mary (Rose) Lewis. Antone and Louise had six children: Frank, Anthony, Mary (who married Manuel Rosa Jr.), Joe, Manuel, and Rosalie Dutra Stober.

Antone also farmed in Clarksburg near Babel Slough. He had to row the children across the river by boat to go to school until they became old enough to row themselves. In 1918 he bought an 84-acre ranch with his uncle by marriage, Jess Lewis. The following year he had it surveyed and discovered that there were only 76 acres, but they were unable to recoup their loss. They had purchased the acreage from Frank Williams.

Antone and his family worked hard, but they had their good times also. A happy occasion was hog-killing time when linguica, morcela, salt pork, bacon, hams, carne e vinho de alhos, and head cheese would be made. Twenty to 30 relatives and friends from the city would be invited to dinner. Lung stew with heart, fried liver, cooked potatoes, beans and morcela along with homemade bread would be served. Antone made his own wine.

Antone was the hog killer of the Pocket. During the time to kill the pigs to make the linguica, etc., Antone would be called upon to come to the farm and do the task.

Antone Dutra died June 21, 1973, leaving 16 grandchildren and 20 great grandchildren.

Louise Lewis Dutra was born February 23, 1891 in the Pocket. She went to school across the river and graduated from the eighth grade of Lisbon School. After marrying Antone Dutra she lost her citizenship rights, but regained them in 1924. She was 16 when she married Antone. They lived where there were only Portuguese-speaking people so she lost her knowledge of English. The teacher who taught at the Lower Lisbon School roomed and boarded with the Dutras, so Louise was able to reclaim her English. She died October 27, 1940.

[Mary Dutra Rosa; Tony Dutra]

MANUEL DUTRA (Manuel Dutra da Costa) was born March 5, 1890 in Pedro Miguel, Faial. His mother was Nancy Pinheiro. He first came to the Pocket on May 24, 1909, and then went to work for Joe Lewis from 1909 to 1912, milking 30 cows for a dollar a day. The next four years he worked at the McGillivary ranch, a Holstein dairy on Freeport Road, eventually making $45 a month. They had prize stock which were entered in the State Fair, and which Manuel took care of.

On January 15, 1917, at the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacramento in Sacramento, Manuel, nicknamed Manuel das Vacas," married MARY L. SILVA, born August 25, 1898, daughter of Joe F. "Milhomens" Silva. They first made their home on Folyes Place in the Natomas area where they farmed for about five years. They then moved to Patterson, where Manuel worked on a large dairy of more than 150 cows belonging to Charles Moreing (for whom the Sacramento Solons baseball park was named at one time). He worked there for three years, and then in 1925 Manuel and his brother Joe bought their own dairy in Tracy, also growing alfalfa.

His brother Joe arrived from Faial in 1915 at age 17 and also worked for the McGillivarys in Freeport. The two formed the Dutra Brothers partnership operating dairies in Natomas, Patterson and Tracy, until 1938 when Joe left to get married and be on his own, at which time the business reverted to Manuel, who operated the business until he died December 5, 1957, in Stockton. Joe died March 5, 1968, in Manteca.

Manuel Dutra died December 5, 1957, at age 67. His wife, Mary L. Silva Dutra, alert at age 90, moved into a Sacramento rest home in December 1988.

The children of Manuel and Mary: Marie, born in Natomas; Manuel, born in Patterson; and Angelina, Anna, and Gabriel, born in Tracy. Angelina is now a nun in Alaska. About son Manuel, the Guinness Book of World Records, 1974 edition, has this item: "The hand milking record for cows is 17 1bs 11 oz in 2 minutes from 2 cows by Manuel Dutra of Stockton at the Cow Palace SF Oct. 27, 1970."

In 1946 daughter Marie T. Dutra married Dave Gambrel, son of Anthony and Martha panes) Gambrel, tobacco farmers in Kentucky. They lived on the farm of Marie's grandparents in Natomas from 1948 to 1951 with their two sons Gilbert D. and Michael D. Gambrel, during which time Dave Gambrel worked at the Box Factory at Jack Lewis's ranch on Pocket Road, and then for Setzer Box Factory for 16 years. When the ranch was sold in 1951 they moved into the city. Marie and Dave divorced in 1964. Marie worked as a waitress for 25 years at various Sacramento establishments before retiring.

[Marie Dutra Gambrel]

MANUEL FERREIRA DUTRA (also known as Manuel Faria Dutra, and by the nickname "Chopinho") was born in 1876 in Faial. It is thought he came to America about 1898. He was related to Frank Lewis Sr., in some way. Manuel was first a fisherman and lived on a scow on the Sacramento River. He also repaired fishing nets. At one time he also ran the Glide Free Ferry next to the Antone Dutra ranch in the Pocket.

He became the carpenter of the Pocket. He was a builder, repairman, general handyman and fixed anything that could be fixed. He spent three months working at the Manuel Rosa Jr. home on a remodeling project. He also built homes and repaired the barns in the Pocket. He was always kept busy. People familiar with his building techniques said that he used so many nails that whatever he built would never come down. Instead of a ruler, he used lengths of sticks to measure. Some people never knew Chopinho's real name. Always smiTing and of a quiet nature, he was very much loved by everyone who knew him.

During the 1904 flood he rescued John da Terra and wife Anna (Lewis) da Terra from their flooded home.

Never married, he lived in a house near the levee on the Frates ranch. Chopinho met a very unfortunate and distressing death. He was with a group of men gathered at Pimentel's Ingleside Cafe late one afternoon. Along about dusk Chopinho left on his bicycle for home. He was wearing dark clothing, and he was overtaken and hit by a motorist who didn't see him on the dark, narrow country road. Chopinho didn't survive the accident. He died March 8, 1941, one month shy of 65 years.

[Dolores Silva Greenslate]

From the "Portuguese Pionners of the Sacramento Area" by Lionel Holmes and Joseph D'alessandro -Published by: the Portuguese Historical Society - P.O. Box 161990, Sacramento - California 95616.

Copyright 1996-2009
Privacy, Legal and Copyright Statement